Hillary Clinton spent $212 million, $12 per vote in losing the primary election

In an earlier post I questioned how much money local candidates spent per vote in the 33rd SD and 71st AD primary races. Until we see the final 460’s, including the harder to track I.E.’s, that answer will need to wait.

In the mean time the New York Daily News just published the following on Hillary Clinton’s campaign that I share with Juice readers.

“Eighteen million votes: $212 million. Some 1,926 delegates: $109,823 a pop. Blowing the biggest head start in presidential history: priceless.

From anointed to also-ran, Hillary Clinton spent more money to lose a primary election than any candidate in Democratic Party history.

“The Clinton campaign found itself without adequate money at the beginning of 2008,” chief strategist Mark Penn wrote in a published Op-Ed yesterday – but it was enough of a cash stash to fund the causes she championed.

The money raised could have been better spent.

Instead of throwing it at a failed political bid, Clinton could have achieved a lot of her goals.

The former First Lady, an outspoken proponent of family values, might have delivered a much-needed vacation to working families: sending more than 76,000 families of four from New York to California to visit Mickey, Donald and Goofy.

And don’t forget the economy.

Instead of throwing cash away, she might have better invested the $11 million she gave her campaign by buying everyone in New York City a Mega Millions ticket.

And she could have bought 9,838 people a new hybrid Toyota Prius, or given out 70.7 million energy-efficient light bulbs. “

To read the entire report simply click on the following link.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/2008/06/09/2008-06-09_hillary_clinton_paid_a_heavy_price_for_p.html,

Juice readers. Can a candidate running for president get their party nomination without having deep pockets of personal wealth or being connected to “special interests” that fund your campaigns?

And, if you do take special interest money, can you promote public policy that is free from any obligations to those same supporters?

 


About Larry Gilbert