[POSTPONED!] To Protect Manley (and Royce?), Brea Council Offers Tuesday Sneak Attack on Most of the First Amendment


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Fast - outside Rep Ed Royce's Office

Dwight Manley’s and Rep. Ed Royce’s Nightmare on Birch Street: the continued presence of Latino and Asian protesters like Dayne Lee, Ana Lety Hernandez (wearing sign), and “Grandma Cha” in front of Royce’s lofty Brea Birch Street office slamming his voting record.  (It’s not clear whether that’s a projection of Ed Royce himself looking out of the second-story window.)  Brea Grand Landlord and Political Boss Manley wants to put a stop to all THAT!

UPDATE:  The first thing that Brea Mayor Glenn Parker did after the Pledge of Allegiance was to seek — and receive — unanimous consent to take the item off of the agenda to be brought up no earlier than the Council’s Jan. 16 meeting, “in light of additional information that they had recently received from the community.”  (That’s my paraphrase from memory.)  When this was met with strangled cries from some in the audience who wondered whether they could still speak on the issue and whether the meeting would be open and noticed, Parker had the good sense to violate protocol to answer them directly from the dais rather than cast them from the room for violating protocol (possibly inviting a bloodbath. But probably not.)

This was the right move.  Activists willing to sit through the video on the Brea Centennial and recognition of its Committee members get to speak today and register their feelings and emotions, which may then be taken into account, but then also come back in a month and hold their feet to the fire to the extent that they don’t come up with a better plan — or, better yet, a decision against any plan at all.

This would not have happened without the prompt and intensive activism of some outraged Brean insiders, of Indivisible 39, of OC Young Democrats, of UNITE-HERE and it’s partners, and of the unaffiliated activists here in the Council Chambers with me right now.

A Luta Continua — The Struggle Continues — but at least we didn’t lose outright tonight by a sucker punch knock-out.  I will be putting in a CPRA request after seeing the video of Parker’s speech, seeking among other things to find out what information changed their minds, why it wasn’t available before, and what motivated this whole craziness in the first place.

[Original post follows]

I hate having to go to a Brea City Council meeting this week, given that I’m mostly convalescing both online and offline these days, but my little city — politically dominated this decade by twerpy testy greedhead developer/landlord Dwight Manley — is preparing to do something SO TOTALLY WRONG this Tuesday, out of fealty to both the landlord twerp and his tenant the Congresstwerp, that I feel I have no choice.  If you love the right to free speech, freedom of assembly, and the right to petition the government with grievances, then you should come along too and speak your mind.

And if you’re one of the five or six Democratic candidates and two independents (plus whoever Tony Bushala might run) planning to take on Congresstwerp Ed Royce in the upcoming election — or if you’re Ed Royce himself and (even less likely) you actually don’t want the Brea City Council to sacrifice these essential freedoms just to make it easier for you to pretend that people don’t HATE, HATE, HATE the votes you’ve recently been casting in Congress — then you should DEFINITELY show up and record a little 2-3 minute campaign video on the City of Brea’s website on the City Council’s dime.  It’s a great chance to tell the Council that you don’t think that, if elected to Congress and officed on Brea’s Birch Street, YOU should be spared the indignity of facing public protest, because unlike the congresstwerp your spine is not made of candyfloss and feathers.  (Note: if Ed Royce shows up Tuesday night and vigorously takes this pro-freedom position, I will feel unable refer to him as “Congresstwerp” again until the polls close on November 5, even if in other respects he continues to be a pulsating fluorescent spangled twerp.)

Here’s the City Manager’s Staff Report on the new ordinance, which received a first reading with I’m told nary a comment previously and is not headed for what’s slated to be its LAST reading, as the plan is to waive any more readings before taking a final vote.

Subject:
Public Assembly Regulations – Adopt Ordinance No. 1201 Establishing Public Assembly Regulations and Amending the Brea City Code for Second Reading by Title Only and Waive Further Reading.

RECOMMENDATION
Adopt Ordinance No. 1201.

BACKGROUND/DISCUSSION
Demonstrations, marches, parades, processions, and rallies are regularly conducted on the City’s streets, sidewalks, parks, and other public property each year. Although such activities involve free speech rights, the City has the ability to impose content-neutral time, place, and manner regulations to promote substantial government interests including the following: protecting the safety, comfort, and convenience of persons using streets, sidewalks, parks, and other public property; regulating competing uses of public fora; maintaining public property in an attractive and intact condition; preventing unreasonable interferences with residential properties and lawful businesses; and defraying the cost of certain departmental services provided for the activities.

On December 5, 2017, the City Council unanimously introduced the attached Ordinance No. 1201 to add a new Chapter 12.28 to the City Code to establish public assembly regulations consistent with federal and state court precedents. The key components of these regulations are as follows:

– An assembly permit requirement for public assemblies that meet certain criteria
– Prohibitions on the carrying or possession of certain items at a public assembly
– Prohibitions on certain conduct at a public assembly
– Restrictions on the use of sound amplification devices at a public assembly
– An indemnity requirement
– A departmental services reimbursement requirement

For purposes of these regulations, the term “public assembly” is defined as a demonstration, march, parade, procession, or rally that assembles or travels in unison on a street, sidewalk, park, public right-of-way, or other public property owned or controlled by the City and that meets any one of three criteria. The first criteria is that the activity does not comply with applicable traffic laws, regulations, or controls. The second is that the activity takes place on public property in Downtown Brea and involves 30 or more participants (this criteria reflects the City Council’s direction to revise the 20 participant threshold proposed by staff). The last is that the activity takes place on public property outside of Downtown Brea and involves 75 or more participants. There is a lower threshold for Downtown Brea because, due to the unique and compact nature of that area, public assemblies there can be unreasonably disruptive with fewer participants than public assemblies elsewhere.

These regulations will exempt certain public assemblies from the permit requirement. For example, no permit will be required to conduct a public assembly at the City Hall plaza in response to news or affairs coming into public knowledge within three days prior to such public assembly. There also are exemptions for public assemblies in facilities rented from the City, for activities conducted pursuant to a film permit issued by the City, and for funeral processions. In accordance with the City Council’s direction, if an exemption is not applicable, then the permit application will have to be submitted at least four days prior to the proposed public assembly regardless of the location of the event.

Now if you’re like me, you might be thinking to yourself “huh, that doesn’t seem too hard to beat, given some technicalities or terminology and drafting errors that need not be expressed here, and given that it will probably not be applied in certain other situations (such as sports pep rallies) it’s likely to end up not being content-neutral after all, setting up the City of Brea for a nice fat series of lawsuits.”  But let’s not get into that today.  Let’s focus instead on the sections that I’ve rendered in brownish-orange.

(1) Let’s be clear on one thing from the outset: Dwight Manley owns the bulk of Brea Downtown, so much of this is a giveaway of your rights to make him happy.

Why does the Council want to make him happy, you may ask, because you haven’t been paying attention?  That’s because:

  1. Three years ago, he basically bought the majority of the seats on the Council with unprecedented volumes of campaign contributions;
  2. He then forced the Council to give him a gigantic new parking garage at public expense, to improve the value of his property, and pitched a fit this year when the public wasn’t going to give him the Great Glass Elevator that he wanted, so he made the Council spend for on it;
  3. A year ago, to destroy a school bond that would increase property taxes — and did I mention that he owns the bulk of the property in Downtown Brea? — he spent massively not only to fight that bond but also to try to take over a majority on the School Board so that no future bonds could be proposed.

Dwight Manley seems to see Downtown Brea as sort of his own Main Street Disneyland, and he wants to make the place look spiffy and happy for the tourists, rather than someplace where people live and have political grievances that they want to express.  So you present unsightly protests in Manleyland, even if some huge sudden national political development happened, he’s happy for you to join in public protests that can’t be scheduled four days in advance, so long as they are restricted to City Hall Plaza, where few people are, rather than occurring in THE PUBLIC DOWNTOWN AREA, where lots of people are.  You still get to protest, just not where people have to look at your unsightly selves.

Even if you do have four days advance notice, there are still limits on your use of sound systems, AND on what you can carry with you (except presumably concealed weapons, unless Manley wants to go after the Second Amendment too), AND on your “conduct.”

We’re talking about what happens ON PUBLIC LAND HERE!  The Public Downtown becomes entirely adapted to Manley’s PRIVATE wishes — and economic benefit.

But that’s not the worst of it.  Look up at the last two lines in that summary list above. “An indemnity requirement” and “A departmental services reimbursement requirement.”  What do those mean?  Essentially, you had best not plan on exercising your first Amendment rights in Brea unless you’re willing to pay to do so and to cover whatever additional costs might ensue from your doing so — which I’m guessing includes fights breaking out because hooligans don’t like your message.

Outraged yet?  Let’s look at the actual wording of the ordinance, so you don’t have to take my (or the City Manager’s) characterization of it as gospel.  Bear in mind: You’ve probably just heard of this for the first time now and the plan is for the city cancel not even to require any additional debate after this Tuesday, when it wants it to have passed!   So here’s the ordinance, copied from the PDF at this link:

December 19, 2017

ORD. 1201

ORDINANCE NO. 1201

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF BREA
ESTABLISHING PUBLIC ASSEMBLY REGULATIONS AND AMENDING
THE BREA CITY CODE

THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF BREA DOES ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS:

A. RECITALS:

(i) Demonstrations, marches, parades, processions, and rallies are regularly
conducted on the City’s streets, sidewalks, parks, and other public property each year.

(ii) The purpose of this Ordinance is to promote the City’s interests in protecting
the safety, comfort, and convenience of persons using streets, sidewalks, parks, and
other public property; regulating competing uses of public fora; maintaining public
property in an attractive and intact condition; preventing unreasonable interferences with
residential properties and lawful businesses; and defraying the cost of certain
departmental services provided for public assemblies.

(iii) Downtown Brea is a unique, compact pedestrian-friendly area devoted to
shopping, entertainment, and dining uses. The City Council finds that the permit
requirement threshold for public assemblies in Downtown Brea must be lower than the
permit requirement threshold for public assemblies in other areas because public
assemblies in Downtown Brea can be unreasonably disruptive with fewer participants
than public assemblies in other areas.

B. ORDINANCE:

SECTION 1. The facts set forth in the Recitals, Part A of this Ordinance, are true and
correct.

SECTION 2. Title 12 (Streets, Sidewalks and Public Property) of Part I (Municipal Code)
of the Brea City Code is amended by adding a new Chapter 12.28 to read as follows:

“CHAPTER 12.28: PUBLIC ASSEMBLIES
Section
12.28.010 Short Title
12.28.020 Purpose
12.28.030 Definitions
12.28.040 Permit Requirement
12.28.050 Permit Exemptions
12.28.060 Permit Processing
12.28.070 Prohibited Items
12.28.080 Prohibited Conduct
12.28.090 Sound Amplification
12.28.100 Indemnity
12.28.110 Departmental Service Charges
12.28.120 Violations

§ 12.28.010 Short Title.
This chapter shall be known and may be cited as the “Public Assembly Ordinance”.

§ 12.28.020 Purpose.
The purpose of this chapter is to promote the City’s interests in protecting the
safety, comfort, and convenience of persons using streets, sidewalks, parks, and other
public property; regulating competing uses of public fora; maintaining public property in
an attractive and intact condition; and defraying the cost of certain departmental services
provided for public assemblies.

§ 12.28.030 Definitions.
For the purpose of this chapter, the following definitions shall apply unless the
context clearly indicates or requires a different meaning.

CITY MANAGER. City Manager or designee thereof.

DEPARTMENTAL SERVICE CHARGE. Actual fire safety and traffic control costs
incurred by the City in connection with a public assembly for which an assembly permit
is issued.

DOWNTOWN BREA. That portion of the City bounded by Imperial Highway on
the south, by Brea Boulevard on the east (including properties with frontage on the east
side of Brea Boulevard), by Ash Street on the north, and by the terminus of Birch Street
and the Gateway Shopping Center on the west. A map depicting the boundaries of the
Downtown Brea area is available for public inspection in the office of the City Clerk during
normal business hours of the City.

INDIGENT NATURAL PERSON. A person who satisfies either of the following criteria:

1. Is receiving benefits pursuant to the Burton-Moscone-Bagley
Citizens’ Income Security Act for Aged, Blind and Disabled Californians (Welfare and
Institutions Code § 12000 et seq.), the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to
Kids Act (Welfare and Institutions Code § 11200 et seq.), the Supplemental Nutritional
Assistance Program (7 U.S.C. § 2011 et seq.), or Welfare and Institutions Code § 17000.

2. Whose monthly income is 125% or less of the current monthly
poverty line annually established by the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

PUBLIC ASSEMBLY. A demonstration, march, parade, procession, or rally that
assembles or travels in unison on a street, sidewalk, park, public right-of-way, or other
public property owned or controlled by the City and that meets any of the following criteria:

1. Does not comply with applicable traffic laws, regulations, or controls.

2. Takes place on public property in Downtown Brea (including any
areas over which an easement for public pedestrian use or access exists) and involves
30 or more participants.

3. Takes place on public property outside of Downtown Brea and
involves 75 or more participants.

SOUND AMPLIFICATION DEVICE. Any bullhorn, megaphone, speaker, or
similar device used to amplify the volume of a voice or a sound.

§ 12.28.040 Permit Requirement.

No person shall conduct or participate in a public assembly unless an assembly
permit has been issued for such activity.

§ 12.28.050 Permit Exemptions.

An assembly permit shall not be required for any of the following:

A. Public assemblies that are conducted at the City Hall plaza and are
occasioned by news or affairs coming into public knowledge less than three days prior to
such public assembly.

B. Public assemblies in a City facility that has been rented from the City.

C. Activities conducted pursuant to a film permit issued under Chapter 5.224
of this Code.

D. Activities conducted by a governmental agency acting within the scope of
its authority.

E. Funeral processions conducted by a mortuary or funeral home.

§ 12.28.060 Permit Processing.

A. Application Deadline. Assembly permit applications shall be filed with the
City Manager not less than four days prior to the date of the proposed public assembly.

B. Application Contents. Assembly permit applications shall be filed on a Cityprovided
form and shall contain the following information as applicable:

1. Name and contact information for the person who is organizing the
public assembly and will be responsible for its conduct.

2. Name and contact information for the organization on whose behalf
the public assembly is proposed to be conducted.

3. Date, time, and location of the public assembly including any staging
area, disbanding area, and travel route.

4. An estimate of the number of persons who will be participating in the
public assembly.

5. An estimate of the length of the public assembly in miles.

6. An estimate of the number persons who will be observing the public
assembly.

7. The type of security or other arrangements that will be provided to
assure that participants are properly directed.

8. The minimum and maximum speeds that the public assembly is to
travel.

9. The maximum number of march, parade, or procession units in the
public assembly and the maximum and minimum interval of space to be maintained
between the units.

10. The number and type of vehicles in the public assembly.

11. Written permission from the owner of any private property that will
be used as a staging area or a disbanding area.

C. Application Fee. Any person seeking an assembly permit shall pay a nonrefundable
application fee concurrently with the filing of the application. The assembly
permit application fee amount shall be as set by City Council resolution.

D. Indigency Waivers. An indigent natural person shall be exempt from
payment of the assembly permit application fee upon obtaining an indigency waiver. An
organization in which a majority of its members are indigent natural persons also shall be
exempt from payment of the assembly permit application fee upon obtaining an indigency
waiver. A request for an indigency waiver shall be made at the time of permit application
and shall be accompanied by such relevant information and documentation as may be
necessary for verification of eligibility. The City Manager shall grant an indigency waiver
upon verification of eligibility.

E. Permit Approval or Denial. The City Manager shall approve an assembly
permit application unless one or more of the denial findings specified in Paragraph F
below is made in a written notice to the applicant. The City Manager shall consider each
application upon its merits, shall not discriminate in granting or denying applications, and
shall not deny a permit based upon a subject matter or viewpoint involved in a proposed
public assembly.

F. Denial Findings. An assembly permit application shall only be denied on
the basis of one or more of the following criteria:

1. The application is incomplete.

2. The application contains false or intentionally misleading information.

3. The applicant, or the organization on whose behalf the public
assembly is proposed to be conducted, has an unpaid departmental service charge debt
to the City for a prior public assembly.

4. The public assembly is proposed for a time and location for which
another activity has been previously authorized.

5. The public assembly will require the simultaneous closure of the
roadway portion of more than two streets that run in a parallel direction between the hours
of seven a.m. and eight p.m. Monday through Friday, or between the hours of ten a.m.
and six p.m. on Saturday, unless the activity will occur on a national holiday.

6. The public assembly will require closure of the roadway portion of
any street in a commercial zone for more than three hours in any one day between the
hours of seven a.m. and eight p.m. Monday through Friday, unless the activity will occur
on a national holiday.

7. The route or location of the public assembly traverses a street or
other public right of way that was scheduled for maintenance, construction, or repair prior
to the submission of the permit application and the conduct of the public assembly would
interfere with such maintenance, construction, or repair or would create a threat to the
health or safety of the public assembly’s participants.

8. The staging area or disbanding area cannot physically accommodate the number of participants expected by the applicant.

9. The public assembly would result in a violation of any federal, state, or local law[Note: Cannabis remains illegal under federal law.]

G. Permit Conditions. The City Manager may condition an approved permit
with reasonable requirements concerning the time, place, or manner of holding the public
assembly as is necessary to coordinate multiple uses of public property, to assure
preservation of public property, to prevent dangerous, unlawful, or impermissible uses, to protect the safety of persons and property, and to control vehicular and pedestrian
traffic in and around the venue.

§ 12.28.070 Prohibited Items.

A. Prohibitions. No person shall carry or possess any of the following items
while present at a public assembly:

1. Lumber, wood, or wood lath greater than one foot in length.  [Note: for signs]

2. Plastic pipe or metal greater than one foot in length or greater than
one-quarter inch in its thickest dimension.  [Note: for signs]

3. A sign, poster, plaque, or notice that is not constructed solely of a
cloth, paper, or cardboard material less than one-quarter inch in thickness.  [Note: for signs]

4. A projectile launcher or similar device used to hurl an object, liquid,
or other substance.

5. A gas mask or similar device used to filter air breathed and that
would protect the respiratory tract and face against irritating, noxious, or poisonous
gases.

B. Exceptions. Paragraph A does not apply to the following:

1. Any person carrying or possessing a piece of wood that satisfies all
of the following criteria:

a. Is blunted at its ends.
b. Is two inches or less in width.
c. Is one-fourth inch or less in thickness or, if not generally
rectangular in shape, is three-fourths inch or less in its thickest dimension.

2. Any disabled person carrying or possessing a cane, walker, or  similar item necessary for such person’s mobility.

§ 12.28.080 Prohibited Conduct.

No person shall engage in any of the following conduct while present at a public
assembly:

A. Violate any permit condition contained in the assembly permit issued for the
public assembly.

B. Fail to abide by instructions given by a traffic control officer or law
enforcement officer for the purpose of accommodating emergency vehicles or traffic
through a public assembly route.

C. Give traffic control instructions to non-participants of the public assembly.

D. Ignite or burn any open flame device (including a candle, portable or
stationary torch, road flare or fuse, fuel fired lantern, signal flare or sky lantern), bonfire,
recreational fire, cooking fire, warming fire, sign, or effigy.

§ 12.28.090 Sound Amplification.

A. Time Restriction. No person at a public assembly shall utilize a sound
amplification device between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 9:00 a.m.

B. Manner Restrictions. No person at a public assembly shall utilize a sound
amplification device that does any of the following:

1. Produces loud or raucous noises which interferes with the conduct
of any business in the vicinity of the assembly.

2. Disturbs the peace, quiet, and comfort of persons in the vicinity of
the assembly.

3. Is audible at a distance of 250 feet from the point from which the  broadcast emanates.

§ 12.28.100 Indemnity.

A. Requirement. An assembly permit shall not be effective until the permittee
has submitted to the City Manager an executed indemnification agreement approved as
to form by the City Attorney.

B. Scope. The indemnification agreement shall require the permittee to
defend, indemnify, and hold the City and the City’s officers’ employees, and agents
harmless from and against claims, damages, expenses, loss or liability arising out of or
resulting from the alleged acts or omissions of the permittee or the permittee’s officers,
employees, or agents in connection with the permittee’s public assembly. The
indemnification agreement shall not make the permittee responsible for losses to the City
arising from audience reaction to the permittee’s public assembly; shall not make the
permittee responsible for activities at the permittee’s public assembly that are outside of
the permittee’s control; and shall not require the permittee to waive any cause of action
the permittee might otherwise have against the City.

C. Exception. An indemnification agreement shall not be required if the
permittee cooperates with the City Manager to design the public assembly to respond to
specific risks, hazards, and dangers to the public health and safety identified by the City
Manager as being reasonably foreseeable consequences of the public assembly.

§ 12.28.110 Departmental Service Charges.

A. Reimbursement Requirement. A permittee shall reimburse the City for
departmental service charges incurred in connection with or due to the permittee’s public
assembly. No permittee is required to pay for the cost of law enforcement personnel to
provide for the protection of a public assembly and its attendees from hostile members
of the public or from counter-demonstrators, or to pay for the cost of general law
enforcement in the vicinity of the event.

B. Invoice. No later than 30 business days after the expiration of an assembly
permit, the City Manager shall issue the permittee an itemized invoice of departmental
service charges incurred in connection with or due to the permittee’s public assembly.

C. Payment Deadline. No later than 30 business days after issuance of the
invoice, a permittee shall remit to the City Manager payment for the departmental service
charges specified in such invoice.

D. Exception. This Section shall not apply to any person who has been
exempted from payment of the assembly permit application fee by receipt of an indigency
waiver.

§ 12.28.120 Violations.

Any person who intentionally violates any provision of this Chapter shall be guilty
of a misdemeanor.”

SECTION 3. The City Council finds that it can be seen with certainty that there is no
possibility the adoption of this Ordinance may have a significant effect on the environment
because it establishes content-neutral time, place, and manner regulations for public
assemblies on City property. It is therefore exempt from California Environmental Quality
Act review pursuant to Title 14, Section 15061(b)(3) of the California Code of Regulations.  [Note: “With certainty!”  hahahahahahahaha!]

SECTION 4. The City Council declares that, should any provision, section, paragraph,
sentence, or word of this Ordinance be rendered or declared invalid by any final court
action in a court of competent jurisdiction, or by reason of any preemptive legislation, the
remaining provisions, sections, paragraphs, sentences, and words of this Ordinance shall
remain in full force and effect.

SECTION 5. The City Clerk shall certify to the adoption of this Ordinance.
APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 19th day of December, 2017.

________________________________
Glenn Parker, Mayor

ATTEST: _____________________________
Lillian Harris-Neal, City Clerk

I, Lillian Harris-Neal, City Clerk of the City of Brea, do hereby certify that the
foregoing Ordinance was introduced at a regular meeting of the City Council of the City
of Brea held on the 5th day of December 2017, and was finally passed at a regular meeting
of the City Council of the City of Brea held on the 19th day of December, 2017 by the
following vote:

AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS:
NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS:
ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS:
ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS:
DATED: December 19, 2017

________________________________
Lillian Harris-Neal, City Clerk

(If only there were a word for the merger of corporate interests and the state!)

Look: it seems pretty clear that the City Council and City Staff is absolutely terrified of Dwight Manley — including his ability to unleash any number of critics onto NextDoor.com.  But this, I suspect, is the moment where he will have gone too far — and City Council members who go this far with him will regret it in early retirement from politics.

AT A MINIMUM, ADOPTION OF THIS DRACONIAN MEASURE SHOULD BE DELAYED UNTIL THE PUBLIC REALIZES  WHAT IS GOING ON!  SNEAKILY SCHEDULING IT FOR VOTE DURING THE CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY SEASON JUST AFTER THE SCHOOL SEMESTERS END — BECAUSE STUDENTS WILL HAVE WANTED TO SAY A FEW THINGS ABOUT IT — IS EVIDENCE FOR THE BAD FAITH OF THE AUTHORS.  THE BEST NEWS FROM THIS IS THAT SO MANY PEOPLE WILL BE SO OFFENDED WHEN THEY SEE IT IN ACTION THAT THEIR ANGER WILL BE USED TO ORGANIZE BREA VOTERS TO RAISE DWIGHT MANLEY’S PROPERTY TAXES TO THE MOOOOOOON!

Remember: if this sort of thing can happen in Brea, it can ALSO happen elsewhere in Orange County.  You’d best stop it here, ye who look at Brea now and smirk — or don’t be surprised when the prime gathering areas are de facto privatized where you live too.  Come speak to the City Council if this strikes you as a stunning suppression of our rights to speech, assembly, and to tell Ed Royce what we really think of him even though his office is in the Brea Downtown Speech Suppression Zone.  If Ed Royce has any sense of self-preservation, he’ll join the pro-freedom cause!

If not — hopefully the person who will replace him will have done so Tuesday evening.


About Greg Diamond

Somewhat verbose worker's rights and government accountability attorney, residing in northwest Brea. General Counsel of CATER, the Coalition of Anaheim Taxpayers for Economic Responsibility, a non-partisan group of people sick of local corruption. Deposed as Northern Vice Chair of DPOC in April 2014 when his anti-corruption and pro-consumer work in Anaheim infuriated the Building Trades and Teamsters in spring 2014, who then worked with the lawless and power-mad DPOC Chair to eliminate his internal oversight. Occasionally runs for office to challenge some nasty incumbent who would otherwise run unopposed. (Someday he might pick a fight with the intent to win rather than just dent someone. You'll know it when you see it.) He got 45% of the vote against Bob Huff for State Senate in 2012 and in 2014 became the first attorney to challenge OCDA Tony Rackauckas since 2002. None of his pre-putsch writings ever spoke for the Democratic Party at the local, county, state, national, or galactic level, nor do they now. A family member co-owns a business offering campaign treasurer services to Democratic candidates and the odd independent. He is very proud of her. He doesn't directly profit from her work and it doesn't affect his coverage. (He does not always favor her clients, though she might hesitate to take one that he truly hated.) He does advise some local campaigns informally and (so far) without compensation. (If that last bit changes, he will declare the interest.)