Weinergate distracts from Obama’s War Powers Act violations


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War Powers Act

Readers. There is more pressing issues happening every day that should trump NY Congressman Weiner and his Twitter activities. For those who follow the US Constitution, and the War Powers Act of 1973, let me point out that 60 days have passed since we engaged in the fighting in Libya. And while I will not comment on Libyan president Muammar el-Qaddafi, president Obama has bypassed Congress and went to the UN Security Council to obtain diplomatic approval for our involvement in that civil war.

While a case can be made that there are direct or indirect vital interests at stake, the president continues to flaunt his position and skips Congress to get the blessing of the United Nations.

The following details of the “War Powers Act of 1973” is found at Wikipedia.

The War Powers Resolution of 1973 (50 U.S.C. 1541-1548) is a federal law intended to check the power of the President in committing the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of Congress. The resolution was adopted in the form of a United States Congress joint resolution; this provides that the President can send U.S. armed forces into action abroad only by authorization of Congress or in case of “a national emergency created by attack upon the United States, its territories or possessions, or its armed forces.”

The War Powers Resolution requires the President to notify Congress within 48 hours of committing armed forces to military action and forbids armed forces from remaining for more than 60 days, with a further 30 day withdrawal period, without an authorization of the use of military force or a declaration of war. The resolution was passed by two-thirds of Congress, overriding a presidential veto.”

Gilbert comment. While we may not have boots on the ground, the USAF and perhaps CIA or Special Forces are engaged in this civil war.

Timeline of US involvement in the fighting in Libya: March 17, 2011.

UNITED NATIONS — The United Nations Security Council voted Thursday to authorize military action, including airstrikes against Libyan tanks and heavy artillery and a no-fly zone, a risky foreign intervention aimed at averting a bloody rout of rebels by forces loyal to Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi.

March 18, 2011
President Obama told a bipartisan group of members of Congress today that he expects the U.S. would be actively involved in any military action against Libya for “days, not weeks,” after which he said the U.S. would take more of a supporting role, sources tell ABC News.

March 28, 2011 commentary from president Obama.
Explaining his decision to authorize the use of U.S. military force as part of international operations in Libya, President Barack Obama said Monday night that the United States must act when its interests and values are threatened. The president ruled out seeking regime change in Libya through military means, but he said the United States and other nations will continue to seek Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s departure.

Following is part of a June 7, 2011 article on the current fighting in Libya.

Obama said there had been “significant” progress in the NATO operation. “What you are seeing across the country is an inexorable trend of the regime forces being pushed back, being incapacitated,” Obama news conference in Washington. “I think it is just a matter of time before Gaddafi goes.”

What did the president tell the American public and Congress? Our military action would end “in days, not weeks.” Mr. president your 60 days are up! Congress should not be in the drivers seat pressing the White House to address this military involvement. The ball is in Obama’s court.


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